Halley Knigge (Griffin)

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Fashion quirks

Do you ever do that thing when you first walk out of the house where you quickly tally everything you’re wearing?

Magazines do it sometimes – take a picture of a girl on the street and go through the list:

* Gibson peasant top by way of Nordstrom Rack, $30
* Merona for Target dress pants, $24.99
* Steve Madden ballet flats, $50
* Bangle/earrings: Macy’s and Nordstrom Brass Plum, $16
* Total cost of my “Boho/professional” outfit: $120.99

I caught myself doing this the other day and suddenly realized: I do this every single day. And the scary part? I don’t think I’ve ever come in at under $100. In fact, it is really, really hard to come in under $100. And it makes sense: shoes and pants and shirts and sweaters add up. How much does your outfit cost right now?

I do it without thinking. It’s as unconscious as determining the “theme” of my outfit as I’m walking out the door.

Wait, you say that’s not normal? The rest of you don’t do the “hmm, today I have sort of a cowgirl/under-the-sea/crazy vibe going …” ?

Interpretation: I apparently believe that I live in a fashion magazine/fantasy world/on Project Runway … ?

Me right now:

* Huskies sweatshirt, $40
* Pen Yan, New York tourist tee shirt, $10
* Yoga pants, $24.99
* Sheepskin slippers from that kiosk at the Tacoma Mall (a Christmas present from little brother Noah): $60
* Total cost of my “Thursday night television” outfit: $134.99.

Scary.

Spotted on my (dirty) bumper:

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The post-post-college blues

So maybe the title of this post is a little misleading.
I’ve been out of school for nearly two years now – and I don’t exactly have the blues. What I do have is a new appreciation to anyone who’s ever moved to a new town and started completely fresh – with no friends, and no clear idea about how to make them.
How do people meet people, anyway?
I was never the kind of girl who had trouble making friends – I’ve always been happiest when I’m going in 20 directions at once, surrounded by people at all times. Then I graduated.
My first year out was a bit of a cheat – yes, I was the new girl in town, with a new job and new apartment, but I was working with so many young, fresh-from-school people that it felt like an extension of undergrad.
This year, though. What do you do when you move to a new town (or an old town, with all new people in it)? When your best friends are scattered across the country? When your coworkers are so fun but so married with children, when you realize that you could go a year without meeting a single new person if you don’t shake up your routine?
I moved back so quickly this summer and moved right in with my mom to save the hassle of shopping for an apartment. We’d go to work, come home and walk the dogs, go to the gym, eat dinner. And then I had a scary thought: it could be me, my mom and the dogs forever.
Friends of mine from university and elsewhere had the same trouble. A friend from high school moved to Palo Alto and started sniffing around on Craigslist for friends. Don’t resort to that.
It’s hard, I know. Girls don’t really meet girlfriends in bars; we’re all too preoccupied at the gym. Even if you find the occasional chill person, chances are they have their own friends and lack the same … desperation for new ones.
So I shook things up: joined an intramural dodgeball league, a few Meetup groups, and lo and behold, started to meet other young professionals in the same boat as me. I still miss my solid group from university, but I’m working on it.
It’s nice to have friends, eh?

Here’s my most loyal one.


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Last day in Idaho

Things that I have learned during my 13.5 months in rural Idaho:

1. The “East Side” doesn’t actually refer to the Bellevue/Kirkland/Sammamish/Redmond block.

2. People from North Idaho are prone to get really agitated if all you know about their state is potatoes. In fact, most of the potatoes eaten in Northern Idaho were actually grown in Washington.

3. This is a big, empty state. There’s a reason the highway system is so spotty – because the highways that exist already connect the few medium-to-large cities in Idaho. Everything else is just “rural.”

4. I really, really need to live in a city with a Gap, a Nordstorm, a decent thrift store and an Indian restaurant.

5. Rural girl, I am not.
I’m oh-so-happy to be going home.


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New blog

Check me out at Tacoma Girl on the West Side.

It’s been two years, but Tacoma Girl is back and ready to conquer new lands.

I finished my degree just over a year ago, and spent my time since then trying the handle of “newspaperwoman” on for size.

After a year reporting the news from Idaho, the state of citizen militias, Aryan pride and Larry Craig, I’m ready to tackle something truly foreign: the twenty-somethings of Tacoma.

I may have grown up in lovable T-Town, but that doesn’t mean I know anything about what it means to be 23 there. My old friends have moved away, my baby brothers have grown up, and I don’t even have a good-to-go pass.

Here’s hoping 13 months as an Idahoan gave me a fresh perspective on what it truly means to be a gritty Tacoman.


Thanks www.tacomakids.com


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Back in the saddle

It’s been two years, but Tacoma Girl is back and ready to conquer new lands.

I finished my degree just over a year ago, and spent my time since then trying the handle of “newspaperwoman” on for size.

After a year reporting the news from Idaho, the state of citizen militias, Aryan pride and Larry Craig, I’m ready to tackle something truly foreign: the twenty-somethings of Tacoma.

I may have grown up in lovable T-Town, but that doesn’t mean I know anything about what it means to be 23 there. My old friends have moved away, my baby brothers have grown up, and I don’t even have a good-to-go pass.

Here’s hoping 13 months as an Idahoan gave me a fresh perspective on what it truly means to be a gritty Tacoman.


Thanks www.tacomakids.com